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A Court must have two kinds of jurisdiction to hear a case. First, the Court must have subject matter jurisdiction, meaning it must have the right to hear the issues that are being addressed in the case. Second, the Court must have personal jurisdiction, meaning it must have authority over the people in the case.


Subject Matter Juridiction

Subject matter jurisdiction cannot be waived, even if both of the parties want a certain Court to here the case. A person seeking a divorce in Orange County, Florida usually must have lived in Florida for at least six months prior to filing for a divorce to ensure that the order entered by the Court will not be set aside in the future.

Personal Jurisdiction

Subject matter jurisdiction cannot be waived, even if both of the parties want a certain Court to here the case. A person seeking a divorce in Orange County, Florida usually must have lived in Florida for at least six months prior to filing for a divorce to ensure that the order entered by the Court will not be set aside in the future.



Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction Enforement Act (UCCJEA

Florida has adopted a form of the UCCJEA, a series of laws that help to address jurisdictional issues involving custody issues. Many states use the UCCJEA framework to avoid conflicts over jurisdiction with other states. The goal of the UCCJEA is to avoid disputes between Courts about which Court should be addressing custody issues concerning a child. The UCCJEA also seeks to prohibit parents from attempting to shop for a more favorable jurisdiction in which their issue can be heard.

Parental Kidnapping Prevention Act (PKPA)

The PKPA is different from the UCCJEA in that it is a federal, not state, law. Even though it is a federal law, the PKPA has similar goals to the UCCJEA and is heard in state Courts.

Full Faith and Credit

The Courts in Florida may have jurisdiction to hear an issue, but they also have a duty to give full faith and credit to ruling of other Courts. Under certain circumstances, Florida may have the right to hear an issue that has been ruled on by another Court.